Passionate About Boston
and the Moms Who Live Here

5 Ways to Teach Your Children about Art in Boston

Boston is an amazing city, full of history and beauty all around. I love Boston for a million reasons, from its walkability to its easy driving (OK… kidding). I also love art and teaching art — especially to my own children. Here is a combination of these loves — my top five ways to teach your children about art in Boston.

1. Museums

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

No brainer here — museums are a fantastic place to learn about art. But do you know about all the different museums in Boston? The MFA is an obvious choice (don’t forget my pointers when you go), but there are many other amazing museums right in our city. Here is my short list:
  • The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum: My favorite place — and where my husband proposed to me! Note: Anyone named Isabella gets in for free.
  • The ICA: But check out the exhibits beforehand online — on occasion, they are not kid friendly.
  • The Fogg Art Museum at Harvard: This is a favorite, but don’t forget that this college town has a bounty of museums at each university or college! Being an alum of Brandeis might make me biased, but the Rose Art Museum is a total hidden gem!

2. Public sculpture

 Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment Sculpture: a tribute memorial to the first African American men who fought in the Civil War

Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment Sculpture: A tribute memorial to the first African American men who fought in the Civil War.

There are beautiful sculptures all around our city. The most famous is the Make Way for Ducklings sculpture, of course, but there are loads more all around. Never noticed? This is common, so check out the Boston Art Commission‘s amazing website to be reminded of the sculpture and beauty in every corner of our fine city. If you really fall in love with sculptures and talking with your kids about them, pack a picnic and head to the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln, which is a blast (and free on the first Wednesday of every month!).

3. Architecture

The Ray and Maria Stata Center at MIT

The Ray and Maria Stata Center at MIT

The Boston area is home to amazingly beautiful architecture — some old buildings, some modern, and even some flops. Stop and take a minute to look at each building with your kids, and ask them about what they see. Some buildings are practically out of a Dr. Seuss book (my favorite here), and some look pregnant (I am not even making this up — I learned about this in my Boston architecture course in college!). Grab a sketchbook and draw some of these architectural wonders if you have the time!

4. Artists at work

SOWA Market

SOWA Market

Hopping around Boston looking at art is so fun, but watching artists at work is even more potent for a young child. SOWA is a favorite spot of mine (and everyone else in Boston — it is crowded!) to see artists at work. Peek in some studios or see the artists at the market and enjoy the process, not just the product. If you don’t want to trek into Boston, find out when your own neighborhood has open studios so you can share the magic of real live artists creating in their own studios — there is nothing more inspiring!

5. Your own backyard (or kitchen or bathtub)

Ain't no party like a painting party

Ain’t no party like a painting party

Don’t forget that your children are innately creative and have so much to share and discover! Grab some paper and create! I know that it can be hard to allow such a mess (even for us art teachers — it’s different when it’s in your own home) so I suggest heading to the bathtub. Just go crazy, make a mess, and have a great time! There is nothing more fun than a painting session, and there’s no better way to learn about art than making some yourself!

Also, Art Week Boston is happening NOW! Check it out!

If you do try any of these five tips, be sure to tag @bostonmomsblog on Instagram and use the hashtag #BMBLittleArtists!

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